Rainbow Fried Rice | Cook For Your Life
fried rice

Rainbow Fried Rice

5
Rated 5 out of 5
5 out of 5 stars (based on 1 review)

Person Icon for Serving Size 4 servings

This takeout classic is surprisingly easy and adaptable for any homecook. You might even be surprised to know that fried rice is a one-pan dish and a perfect dish for adding any assortment of...


Ingredients

    2 tablespoons soy or oyster sauce

    1 teaspoon rice vinegar

    1 teaspoon sesame oil

    1 tablespoon canola or vegetable oil

    1 large carrot, small dice

    1 small onion, small dice

    8 ounces extra firm tofu, drained, cut into 1/2″ dice

    3 eggs, whisked

    4 cups cooked brown rice (day-old recommended)

    3 garlic cloves, peeled, minced

    1 (1-inch) piece fresh gingerroot, minced or finely grated

    4 green onions, thin sliced

    1 cup frozen peas, thawed

    1 cup toasted and unsalted cashews, coarsely chopped

    1 tablespoon fresh mint, roughly chopped

    1 tablespoon fresh basil, roughly chopped

Missing an Ingredient?
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Nutrition Facts

Calories

632 cals

Fat

30 g

Saturated Fat

5 g

Polyunsaturated Fat

8 g

Monounsaturated Fat

14 g

Carbohydrates

69 g

Sugar

5 g

Fiber

9 g

Protein

27 g

Sodium

355 mg

Directions

  1. Mix together the soy sauce, vinegar, and sesame oil in a small bowl and set aside.
  2. Add canola oil to a large pan or well-seasoned wok over medium-high heat. When the oil is rippling, add carrot and onion and cook until tender, about 4 minutes.
  3. Add tofu and cook until golden, about 3 minutes. Pour in whipped eggs from sides and let cook undisturbed for a few seconds before mixing up with cooked vegetables. Add rice, garlic, ginger, green onion, peas, cashews, and soy sauce mixture, cook for 1-2 minutes to heat through.
  4. Serve immediately topped with fresh mint and basil and enjoy.

Chef Tips

You can easily substitute two tablespoons of chopped cilantro for mint and basil in this recipe.

Leftover cooked rice is perfect for fried rice recipes because they’re slightly drier and will absorb flavors better. You could also substitute quinoa or another cooked grain, and even riced cauliflower as well.

Registered Dietitian Approved

Our recipes, articles, and videos are reviewed by our oncology-trained dietitians to ensure that each is backed with scientific evidence and follows the guidelines set by the Oncology Nutrition for Clinical Practice, 2nd Ed., published by the Oncology Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group, a professional interest group of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and the American Institute for Cancer Research and the American Cancer Society


Comments

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Rated 5 out of 5
July 3, 2021
anonymous

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